Education

Smelly..Smelly..Smelly…

What smells did you associate with Holland before you came here? Smell produces reactions in us–happy, emotional, dizzy…sick. Particular scents also triggers associations, making us automatically recall something or someone special to us.

Below, some TU Delft and IHE foreign students share their sense of smell in Holland with us.

Yalun (Chemical Engineering, Indonesia): “Holland’s famous for flowers, so I expected Holland to smell like flowers.” Reza (Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management (TBM), Indonesia): “The smell of plastic gifts. It’s very specific and hard to describe, but I always liked that smell, because when I was a kid I often got plastic gifts from an aunt who lived in Holland.”

Kwenja Mvuria (IHE, Kenya): “I expected Holland to smell like flowers, but it turns out to smell like the cold breeze.”

Catherine Hoyle (IHE, USA): “Holland’s famous for cheese and cows, so I thought it’d smell like cows everywhere. Because there’s so much (sea) water here, I also expected to smell the sea and clean water.”

Fabio Pijnata (Aerospace Engineering, Italy): “I come from Milan, Italy, where there’s so much more pollution. Here, I expected to smell more fresh air.”

Are there any specific smells in TU buildings?

Yalun: “Yes, in Kluyver Laboratorium (biotechnology), there’s a strong smell of alcohol.”

Reza: “The wood smell in the Balthasar van der Polweg student residence. When I enter that building I smell a wood scent, a bit sour, like the smell of wet wood.”

What smells are specific to Delft’s streets?

Yalun: “The smell of cookies in the supermarket…delicious! Also, the smell of Middle Eastern food near my house, a specific curry smell. I smell it when I return home from the TU and it makes me hungry.”

Reza: “In summer, the smell of sweaty people everywhere.”

Catherine: “The smell of the bakery when you thru Delft. I like this smell very much. Fresh bread and cookies. It tempts you to go in buy bread. Sometimes I also smell a sweet scent in Delft, sickening sweet. I don’t like it and don’t know where it comes from.”

Fabio: “The smell from the factory. At first I didn’t know that smell comes from the factory. I thought perhaps a family somewhere was baking a cake. The factory smells odd. I also like the smell of the sea here. It’s a smell we don’t have in my polluted hometown, Milan.”

Is there any smell that you miss from your home country?

Kwenja: “Yes, the smells of certain flowers that only exist in Kenya.”

Catherine: “The smell of dirt, of fresh earth, because my family, especially my mother, does a lot of gardening, so I’m used to that smell.”

Fabio: “The smell of food in the streets.”

Smell produces reactions in us–happy, emotional, dizzy…sick. Particular scents also triggers associations, making us automatically recall something or someone special to us. Below, some TU Delft and IHE foreign students share their sense of smell in Holland with us.

Yalun (Chemical Engineering, Indonesia): “Holland’s famous for flowers, so I expected Holland to smell like flowers.” Reza (Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management (TBM), Indonesia): “The smell of plastic gifts. It’s very specific and hard to describe, but I always liked that smell, because when I was a kid I often got plastic gifts from an aunt who lived in Holland.”

Kwenja Mvuria (IHE, Kenya): “I expected Holland to smell like flowers, but it turns out to smell like the cold breeze.”

Catherine Hoyle (IHE, USA): “Holland’s famous for cheese and cows, so I thought it’d smell like cows everywhere. Because there’s so much (sea) water here, I also expected to smell the sea and clean water.”

Fabio Pijnata (Aerospace Engineering, Italy): “I come from Milan, Italy, where there’s so much more pollution. Here, I expected to smell more fresh air.”

Are there any specific smells in TU buildings?

Yalun: “Yes, in Kluyver Laboratorium (biotechnology), there’s a strong smell of alcohol.”

Reza: “The wood smell in the Balthasar van der Polweg student residence. When I enter that building I smell a wood scent, a bit sour, like the smell of wet wood.”

What smells are specific to Delft’s streets?

Yalun: “The smell of cookies in the supermarket…delicious! Also, the smell of Middle Eastern food near my house, a specific curry smell. I smell it when I return home from the TU and it makes me hungry.”

Reza: “In summer, the smell of sweaty people everywhere.”

Catherine: “The smell of the bakery when you thru Delft. I like this smell very much. Fresh bread and cookies. It tempts you to go in buy bread. Sometimes I also smell a sweet scent in Delft, sickening sweet. I don’t like it and don’t know where it comes from.”

Fabio: “The smell from the factory. At first I didn’t know that smell comes from the factory. I thought perhaps a family somewhere was baking a cake. The factory smells odd. I also like the smell of the sea here. It’s a smell we don’t have in my polluted hometown, Milan.”

Is there any smell that you miss from your home country?

Kwenja: “Yes, the smells of certain flowers that only exist in Kenya.”

Catherine: “The smell of dirt, of fresh earth, because my family, especially my mother, does a lot of gardening, so I’m used to that smell.”

Fabio: “The smell of food in the streets.”

Editor Redactie

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